Monday, October 1, 2012

Temporary vs. Permanent Dentures

Well, I have finally gotten around to getting these pictures up! I apologize in advance, photography is not my forte.

Here are my temporary dentures next to my permanent dentures:


I received my temporary set on December 15, 2010. Impressions were taken 1 week prior while all of my natural teeth were still in tact. That impression was used to make my temporary dentures. After all of my teeth were extracted, they immediately put my temporary set in; hence, the name "immediate dentures".

I was able to help select the color and size/shape of the teeth beforehand. The color looks far more yellow than they did upon first receiving them, probably due to coffee drinking. When I soak them in Stain Away, the stains go......away lol.

I was not able to see what I would look like with my temporary dentures prior to tooth extraction, for obvious reasons. Nevertheless, they ended up looking really nice!

Surgical removal of my teeth, alveoplasty, and the dentures ended up costing around $4150.


When I first received my temporary set, they looked and felt HUGE! This was due to a massive amount of swelling from extractions. As my gums shrank, the dentures became loose.

You will notice a chalky like appearance to my temporary dentures. This is dried up reline material. As your gums shrink, your dentures will become loose, causing sore spots and difficulty eating and/or speaking. Around two weeks I had my first reline. This is where they put a "goopy-like" material in your denture and have you bite down. As the material cures, it molds to your gums, giving your denture a snug fit. This material does not come out and can be brushed and soaked as you would your bare dentures. Over the course of time, you will probably need several relines. This is because your gums will do most of their shrinking during the first nine months to a year after tooth extraction. Since you will need multiple relines during that year, your denture may take on a bulky feeling/appearance. At the end of that year, your temporary set will most likely not fit in the same manner it fit initially. This is when you get your permanent dentures.

Notice how bulky my temporary dentures are in comparison to the permanent set? This demonstrates how my gums have changed since having my teeth extracted.

When you begin the process of getting your permanent dentures, your gums have shrunken (probably significantly) and somewhat stabilized, making it easier to achieve a proper fitting denture.

(some people have the teeth from their temporary set rebased in new acrylic, while some get a "hard reline" and avoid getting a completely new set of dentures)


Now for the difference between my temps and perms. For one, you will notice the the gums are molded around the teeth much better. They look more "realistic". Next, you will notice the difference in color. I honestly can't remember if my temps were A1 or B1 on the shade guide, but they were the whitest of the "natural white" shades. My perms are P4, which is the second to last brightest in the portrait shades......or, bleached shades. One thing you will not notice, but I definitely did) is that the permanent teeth are far sharper than the teeth on my temporary set, making chewing that much easier. They feel more defined, whereas, the teeth on my temps were more rounded and dull, especially the molars.

My permanent set cost around $2200. I go into great detail about the process of getting my perms HERE.

Feel free to ask any questions!



17 comments:

  1. It was nice to have an experience about temporary and permanent dentures. I want to know more about the same.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi so do you wear them all day and take them off at night? can you eat anything you want? do they ever slip off?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am not exactly sure why I never got the notifications for these comments. Maybe I should read my posts more often! I am so sorry this response is so late. Personally, I soaked mine during the day while my husband was at work. I just never really felt comfortable going sans teeth around him. Most do soak them at night. I don't think it matters whether it is night or day, but they do have to soak at some point. I could eat anything I wanted with both sets, though I understand that is not the case with everyone. My ability to eat, I believe, was based more on willpower than any specifics about the dentures. The only time they ever slipped out (not completely, but almost) was right before I got my implants..... I think I sneezed or something and they partially came out LOL. This is totally not the norm, however.

      Delete
  3. Hi! Love your site. Came here form youtube and our stories are very similar.

    Quick question: My dentist offers several different grades (custom, deluxe and premium) of dentures. Are you temps and perms the same grade? If not, what did you go with on the perms? They look beautiful on you (like you had veneers not D's) and I would love to have the same quality.

    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am terribly sorry about the (severely) delayed response. I know most dentists offer low, medium, and high quality dentures and they are typically classified as such (or similar). My temporary dentures were obviously the economy class lol. I don't think the permanent set was the cream of the crop, I think it was more around a midrange quality. I can't remember having any sort of class for the permanent dentures.

      Delete
    2. I'm scare my dentist told me they have to extract my teeth do to bone lost its alot of them im going to get dentures i feel like my life its over i would never get a girlfriend or married cause of this i have went thru alot in life abd now this im devastated. .

      Delete
    3. You will be fine. Be strong. Get it done. And you will be able to go on with your life and it will not make any difference. At first it is difficult, but walk in that office and change your life for the better.

      Delete
  4. I have got teps in at the moment and thay feel huge like you said the only thing i dont understand is the teeth are very long and my over bite is terrible so i can not chew i am a great lover of food its so hart braking seeing my family eating burgers and so on lol what do i do about eating do i stay on soft foods eg soup or should i go to my dentist and ask her if she can correct the problem

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. yes, go back immediately. I have had dentures for 16 yrs and I had a problem eating only the first 30 days, when i'd eat, the roof would come down but after 30 days I never had a problem. I've never used anything to hold mine in place, they come in & out easy and I'm still able to eat anything and the roof doesn't come down ever. So, go back and talk to your dentist. I also heard I was suppose to go back once a year for a reline and never did, 2 times I had a crack in the roof part but, I took to a repair dental place and they fixewd for $60. I've had to do this twice in 16 yrs. So, I guess I'm lucky. I really want new dentures though, these are old and I want new white ones. lol!! Best of luck to you.

      Delete
  5. They gave me permanent dentures right away. They are huge and it looks like I had Botox in my upper mouth. I am still sore and I cannot eat. I sure hope they can fix this problem on Monday. Does anyone have any good advice for me? I'm scared.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it takes 30 days for the swelling to go down and for you to be able to eat without the roof coming down. Also, because your gums are swollen it could look like you have buck teeth (that's what mine looked like) but, after 30 days all was good and, I've had mine 16 yrs without a problem and, i don't use anything to keep them in, I'm able to take in and out easy, probably need them made smaller but, they don't feel like I have a hat in my mouth like they did years ago and they work great!

      Delete
  6. I hadn't upper teeth removed almost two weeks ago. My dentist made a permanent set of dentures and they are HUGE. My upper lip looks like I had Botox. They hurt when they are in my mouth and I cannot eat with them in. I see my dentist on Monday but I am scared!!!!!! Will he fix this for me? Others that I know that have dentures, dentures fit close to their gums. Mine don't. Anyone have any advice for me? Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mine looked bulky in the beginning, also. This should correct itself as the gums settle. Once I had my first reline, I looked good as new. I'd say, after the first 2-3 weeks, if that "monkey lip" doesn't take care of itself, i'd have it addressed but it's really common in the beginning.

      Delete
  7. my temporary liners fit me much better than my permanent dentures. It seemed when the dentist took the mold and gave me a temporary the day before, they fit wonderful. Then the next day when I got the permanent dentures, he had to file and change the dentures. They didn't fit nearly as firm. I am thinking the company making the liner messed up. I wonder if permanent dentures in general, do not fit as well as temporary liners.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Im wondering the same as i saw the dentist and dont understand the diff bet...temp n perm dentures??? there made out of same material right??? Peg!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Temporaries (a.k.a. interims/immediates) and permanent dentures *can* made out of the same material. They differ in the fact that temporaries are exactly just that--- temporary. They are basically made to get you through the healing process after your extractions. You don't want to be in public without any teeth for 6 mo to a year, do you? Temporaries are not going to look too beautiful, they are not going to fit all that great. You really won't know how they look in your mouth until after your extractions. This is because they temporaries are made while you still have teeth in your mouth. The dentist will take impressions of your mouth, pour up a cast and build the temporaries off of that. So they have to do "cast surgery" meaning removing the teeth present on the cast so they can fabricate your temporary. This is why temporaries don't necessarily fit. Some liberties may be taken during this "cast surgery"-- it's just not going to be the most accurate representation of your mouth!
      Once you heal and the bone has resorbed to the point where there's not a lot of changes going on, your dentist will make your permanents. These are the dentures that you will be wearing from then on. You'll still need to visit your dentist every year to get checked for fit (because you're still going to have bone resorption just probably not as fast of a rate as when you first got your teeth extracted) and make sure that no other oral issues are cropping up.
      As far as materials goes...you'll have the basic pink acrylic with temps and perms. But teeth can be customized. They can be plastic or porcelain, they have different shadings and shapes. The list goes on and on. Basically, you don't want to spend a lot money on temporaries because you won't be wearing them after a while. But they can help you and the dentist figure out the esthetics in your permanent denture.

      Delete
  9. I had all my upper teeth removed two weeks ago and will have the rest removed on Monday, how long does it take for the gums to heal before I can start the process of getting my permanent dentures.

    ReplyDelete

Was this article helpful? Share your thoughts!